How Does a Condensing Unit Work in a Marine Refrigeration System?

Freezers are made for different environments and purposes. In marine refrigeration, units have to be able to perform in a tropical climate, be environment resistant and even rustproof, and be crafted to meet the needs and preferences of the owner, captain, and crew. One of those needs is being able to freeze items solid at an extremely low temperature.

A condensing unit, along with a well-insulated box, thermostat, and properly functioning freezer, can accomplish temperatures as low as -20 degrees Fahrenheit.

One of the questions I get when discussing our freezer/refrigerators is, “How does a condensing unit work?”

A function of a condenser is defined as; “In systems involving heat transfer, a condenser is a device or unit used to condense a substance from its gaseous to its liquid state, by cooling it.”

A condensing unit is comprised of all the components required for a refrigeration system to remove heat from the interior of the freezer or refrigerator by putting gas through a meter and into an evaporator. The gas is returned to the condenser which cools the gas, turning it back into a liquid before it is then returned to the compressor to start the process all over again.

Once the temperature inside the box reaches the programmed temperature of the thermostat, the unit stops, and when the temperature returns back above the programmed amount it turns the system back on again. This is the refrigeration system’s cycle.

To simplify, a condensing unit is the heart which makes your freezer or refrigerator work, keeping your food, drinks, or bait cold and fresh so you can enjoy your weekend outing or fishing trip.

Having manufactured handcrafted marine refrigeration systems over forty-five years, we take pride in having informed customers. To help captains, crews, and owners understand their systems better, we provide content on specific aspects of marine refrigeration. What would you like to know more about? Email us your questions at info@frigibar.com.

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